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Why you should stop looking for fundraising silver bullets and unicorns.

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Many marketers/fundraisers desperately hope to find silver bullets or unicorns. They become enamored by shiny objects that are easy to employ. Usually, these technologies and tactics focus on the top of the funnel, generating awareness or (at best) interest.

There Are Only Three Ways to Raise More Money

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Every nonprofit organization needs more of two things: time and money. Okay, every organization (nonprofit or for-profit) could use more of those two resources.

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A challenge for the fundraisers of the world…

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Fundraisers have more competitors now than ever before. Your competition is global. They are everywhere because the Internet has made it easy to become a competitor. Some work from their kitchen tables and others from corporate offices. Scary, isn’t it? You are substitutable. The growth in competition makes your organization exponentially more substitutable. Donors now have more information conveniently available at their fingertips.

3 simple ways fundraisers can improve their LinkedIn profiles to land more meetings and raise more money

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Most fundraiser’s LinkedIn profiles are screwed up! They look like resumes, not invitations. After all, are you trying to raise money or are you looking for another job?

Have you ever had one of these horrible bosses?

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According to Toni Coleman, interim editor in chief of CASE’s CURRENTS Magazine, there are 4 types of horrible bosses : The micromanager. The disinterested boss. The bully. The abuser. Have you worked for one of them? If so, please share your story in the comments section below. Or, for tips on how to be a better manager, check out Toni’s article here. Related Posts: >>What’s missing from most nonprofit mission statements? >>3

How to structure and staff your planned gift shop for the 21st century

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Jim Collins, author of the best-selling book Good to Great , has three big recommendations for all organizations: Get the right people on the bus. Get the right people in the right seats. Get the wrong people off the bus. So what does this mean for you?

Is shaming an effective fundraising strategy?

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I was intrigued. . A few weeks ago one of my employees (Nicole) forwarded the following email to me from her beloved alma mater. It was from the president of the school. Impressive! The subject line made clear that he was going to let her know how she can help the University of _. “That’s interesting,” I thought to myself. I wondered if she felt that the University had helped her so much that she would want to return the favor.

6 major donor expectations you simply cannot ignore

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Dialogue. Major donors expect to be able to have a dialogue with an organization and its staff. Permission. Major donors expect to maintain power over whether or not they grant permission for dialogue to happen. Convenience. Major donors expect their engagements to be convenient for them. Focus.

Could your volunteers solve most of your fundraising problems?

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Volunteerism is the gateway drug leading to major giving and legacy gifts. Proof can be found in the 2016 U.S. Trust® Study of High Net Worth Philanthropy. The study is based on a survey of U.S.

I must sound like a broken record but here’s more nonprofit data that will inspire you to focus more on major donors

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The left-leaning Institute for Policy Studies crunched the data from Giving USA Foundation’s annual philanthropic survey to figure out who was giving what.

4 things pizza and major gift fundraising have in common

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A while back I wrote a blog post that included 5 best practices for delivering progress reports to major donors (sometimes including legacy gift supporters too). Later on, my kids wanted Domino’s Pizza. Honestly, I don’t like their food.

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When it comes to “moves management,” are you concerned too?

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First, what are we really talking about when we say moves management ? Wikipedia says , “moves are the actions an organization takes to bring in donors, establish relationships, and renew contributions.” ” So, moves are what the fundraiser does. Moves are activities. I get it! Fundraisers achieve their goals if they develop plans for their activities. Moves management in fundraising is the development of plans and activities to raise money.

The 5 p’s of engagement fundraising

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1- Permission. Donors have immense power these days. They can ignore your communications! The best way to ensure that they don’t exercise that power is to gain their permission to communicate with them. Having a list of 100,000 matters little if no one engages with your outreach.

3 questions every major donor asks themselves after they give

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“What did they do with my money?”. Would my money yield more impact if I gave it to another organization?”. “Do Do they make me feel good or bad?”. Related Posts: >>5 thoughts that might lead your supporters to feel donor remorse. >>Is Is Your Donor “Endangered”? LIKE THIS BLOG POST? LEAVE YOUR COMMENTS BELOW AND/OR SHARE IT WITH YOUR PEERS! The post 3 questions every major donor asks themselves after they give appeared first on MarketSmart, LLC |.

Your donors want to find meaning in their lives. But are you helping them?

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Sick of my rants yet? I’ve droned on and on about the fact that your job is to make your donors feel good and to facilitate the exchange of dollars for value. And, of course, value is in the eye of the beholder (the donor’s eyes).

Is donor qualification more important than donor identification?

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Identification. If you are a major or legacy gift fundraiser, you’re probably responsible for a group of donors on your caseload or portfolio.

3 major donor myths broken by Andrew Olsen

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Andrew Olsen knows a thing or two about direct marketing. On his blog , he debunks 3 major donor myths that pertain to marketing. You can find them below. Here’s his proof that they aren’t true. Myth #1: Major donors don’t give through the mail or online.

If asking for donations makes you uncomfortable, read this now!

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Recently I was asked the following: “The whole idea of the ‘ask’ is very uncomfortable to me. How can I become more comfortable with it?” ” Here’s my answer: First, if you are uncomfortable with asking, it’s probably for one or all of 3 reasons.

Are you a cold-hearted fundraiser or a warm-hearted facilitator?

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The flow chart below makes me very uncomfortable. Here’s why: Science and experience have led me to realize that a donor’s objective is usually, first and foremost, to find meaning in their life through giving and to feel good knowing their legacy gift will make an impact.

Donor retention and donor qualification go together like peas in a pod

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Some things just work best when coupled together. Peanut butter and jelly. Toothpaste and a toothbrush. Cookies and milk. Soap and water. Simon and Garfunkel. Get the idea? Donor retention and donor qualification. Similarly, you shouldn’t consider donor retention without involving donor qualification because there’s no sense in spending time and effort on retaining donors without a qualification strategy in place. Retention efforts cost money. They are sophisticated too, so they cost time.

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The 6 most read parts of any major gift solicitation letter

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I’m always a bit baffled when I see fundraising letters that fail to take into consideration the following. After all, research by Professor Siegfried Vogele has clearly proven what people read and in what order.

8 Great Ways to End Emails or Letters

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Cultivation starts and ends with great communication. Goodbyes are just as important as hellos. So here are some great ways to end emails you send to donors: 1. First name], I’m really counting on you!

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Why fundraiser job titles suck and cost you a lot of money!

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My pal Dr. Russell James is at it again. This time, he researched what fundraiser job titles inspire more engagement, connectivity, and giving.

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Are fundraising tricks and gimmicks worth doing?

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An old book filled with timeless lessons. I was cleaning out a cabinet last weekend and I came across an old book I read long ago titled Strategic Selling.

4 keys to fundraising success you might be overlooking

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Humanity – Understanding human beings — really taking a deep, genuine interest in their wants, needs, desires, hopes, and dreams.

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5 lessons fundraisers can learn from Subway (Yes! The sandwich shop)

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Here are 5 great lessons fundraisers can learn from Subway : 1. Ask for feedback. Say please. . Use the word “YOU” often. It makes people feel special. Create menus to make it clear what you want them to do (menus will help them make a decision too).

Donor Expectations – Episode 7

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Greg and Tim discuss the six expectations donors have of non-profits in this episode of Engagement Fundraising. The post Donor Expectations – Episode 7 appeared first on MarketSmart, LLC |.

14 things you must know about your donors to win major gifts (including planned gifts)

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Here are 14 things you must know about your donors if you want to raise major and planned gifts (13 of which can be obtained from a donor survey ): 1- Why do they care about your nonprofit’s mission? 2- What programs interest them and why?

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What’s your fundraising asking style?

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According to Brian Saber, “Your ‘Asking Style’ is based on your personality and unique set of strengths in fundraising.” ” But, don’t be fooled by stereotypes.

8 simple ideas to involve your donors and build deeper connections

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Montgomery was a famous author in the early 1900’s. Her novels were internationally renowned. She once said, “Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.” ” This is so true. Involvement is one of the best ways to build seriously deep connections. It can mean the difference between no gift and the ultimate gift. There are millions of ways you can do this. Here are eight of them: Be transparent and give them access with a personal tour.

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You’ve got leads (identified major donor prospects) but are they ‘outreach-ready’?

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People and vendors in our sector talk a lot about identifying donors, but getting them ready to meet with you is a different story. The problem is that most donors simply aren’t ready to talk to you yet. This post was inspired by a horrible meeting. Last week, I met with the Vice President of University Relations at one of the biggest schools in the country. During our chat, I told her that most ‘identified’ major and planned gift prospects need to be cultivated before outreach.

7 things about email subject lines that will help you save the world

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Firstly, email subject lines are actually headlines. The great advertising legend David Ogilvy once said, “On average, five times as many people read the headlines as read body copy. So, when you have written your headline, you have spent eighty cents out of your dollar.”

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Donor Psychology: Do you know what really makes your supporters feel good?

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Funny thing about fundraising is that it all boils down to this: Making sure that your supporters feel good! I know, I know. In the books and webinars, they’ll say, “It’s all about proving impact and results.” ” Others will say, “It’s all about relationships.”

Top 10 reasons why donors like taking donor surveys

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Here are the top 10 reasons why donors like taking donor surveys: 1. They want to be perceived as (or see themselves as) a helpful person. They want to be more involved in your mission. They want their voice to be heard. They want to affect change.

What Fundraisers Can Learn From Restaurants and Waiters

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People give billions of dollars each year to waiters for a lot of the same reasons they give to charities. Social conformity (simply because it’s something you are supposed to do). Reciprocity (in exchange for something of value – service).

5 things great nonprofits do (according to Veritus Group)

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Veritus Group knows more about fundraising than most people learn in a lifetime. Here’s some of their wisdom : 5 things truly great nonprofits do: They pay staff well! They make their projects and programs awesome! They invest in reporting impact in a meaningful way!

How to use verbatims and digital body language to raise more money

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Recently I was interviewed by a woman named Mazarine at Wild Woman Fundraising ! You can hear the interview here. Here’s one big point from the interview I figured you’d want to read (in case you don’t have time to listen to the whole thing).

12 Fundraising Questions Major and Planned Gift Officers Should Be Asking

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Everyone says the number one reason why people give is because they were asked. I think this axiom might need a bit of a tweak as follows: The number one reason why people give is because they were asked questions about themselves before they were asked to give. Tweet this!

Most fundraisers use email the wrong way

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Every marketing channel needs to be optimized and employed properly. Sadly most fundraisers are using email the wrong way. Email should NOT be used primarily for fundraising. Rather it should be used mostly to build engagement. It should be used to tell stories, involve supporters, report back how gifts were used and make them feel good … not so much for asking. Think of an email to a donor as you would an email to your friend. Would you only ask for money from a friend in every email?

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9 simple pointers for writing better emails and letters to your donors

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I failed to get into business school. I hoped to be a business major at the University of Maryland in the 80’s. But my ability to read, comprehend and recapitulate the institution’s business lessons was not so good. I didn’t make the cut and failed to get even close to acceptance into the business school. So, I decided to become a journalism major instead even though I wasn’t very good at writing. My dream was to have my own ad agency some day.

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